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Saturday, October 25 2014 @ 09:43 am BST
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S African MPs: Atrocities in Tibet Should Arouse World’s Conscience

DHARAMSHALA: As the tragic self-immolation of Tibetans continue in Tibet, three leading political parties in South Africa yesterday made statements in the parliament calling on the Chinese government to end its repressive policies which are pushing Tibetans to set themselves on fire.

Ms G MacKenzie, a Member of Parliament from Congress of the People (COPE), tabled a motion in the House for debate on the continued oppression of the Tibetan people by the Chinese government.

In its statement in the parliament, COPE members urged all political parties to call on the Chinese government to ensure freedom of culture, religion and expression for Tibetans inside Tibet.

They urged the South African government to engage the Chinese leadership in substantive dialogue with the Central Tibetan Administration to resolve the issue of Tibet on the basis of Memorandum on Genuine Autonomy for the Tibetan people. The government was also urged include human rights protection as an agenda item in all its bilateral and multilateral discussions with China without yielding to the latter’s Chinese economic, finance and trade power.

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Tibetans arrested in Andu township,Ngaba in April Sentenced to Varying Prison Terms

While most of those arrested from Andu in April have now been released, 40 year old Pulten of Pulten Tsang household in Gyalde Dewa (village) was sentenced to 3 years imprisonment at the Ngaba county Peoples Court on June 2nd. However, it is said that he is entitled to lodge an appeal within a certain period of time. Pulten has a wife and 4 children at home.

On the same day, 37 year old Gyurko of Tsamtsang household in Gyalde Dewa was sentenced to 2 years in prison. They are both accused of refusing new houses built with government aid, and not taking the keys when presented to them.

Pema of Sengge Tsang household in Peke village, Andu township, has not been tried and remains in detention in the county town.

Meanwhile, 29 year old Kirti monastery monk Losang Puntsok was sentenced to 8 years in prison and 4 years deprivation of political rights by the Ngaba prefecture court in Barkham and was soon taken elsewhere to serve the sentence. The crime for which he is arrested is not revealed and his whereabouts and physical condition is not unavailable since his arrest on October 17th 2011.

Lodey, the father of Dargye who committed self immolation in Lhasa on May 27th, recently travelled to Lhasa to see his son, but was not even able to confirm whether his son was still in Lhasa, much less find out anything about his condition, hence returned home disappointed.

It is also reported that prisoners are not being held in Ngaba these days, but taken to distant places to serve their sentence.

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China Admits Challenges to Human Rights Protection

On 11 June 2012, China announced its second National Human Rights Action Plan (NHRAP)1 for the years 2012 to 2015 saying it has a ‘long way to go before fully allowing people to enjoy human right.’

 

The new plan also highlighted religious freedom stating that the Chinese government will ‘protect religious activities in accordance with the law,’ reported Xinhua, the official Chinese news agency. Like the NHRAP (2009-2010), the new document guarantees state protection for a host of civil and political rights, as well as economic, social and cultural rights.

 

The NHRAP (2009-2010) was the Chinese government’s first formal document that ‘guaranteed’ human rights to Chinese citizens and pledged to address human rights violations in the People’s Republic of China.

 

It is difficult to say whether this new plan will bring any real improvement in the human rights situation in Tibet and China. Given the dismal performance during the first plan period, any early expectations might end up being premature and naively optimistic. The NHRAP (2009-2010) generated some enthusiasm and expectation among human rights activists, who called it a giant step forward in the right direction, and expressed hope that the document’s provisions would be implemented to improve the dismal state of human rights in the PRC and not remain just another tool for external propaganda. But despair set in by the end of the plan period. There was no notable change in the human rights situation in Tibet or China.

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S.Korea Buddhists slam China boycott of event

South Korea’s leading Buddhist organisation Thursday criticised China’s boycott of a religious event in protest at a Tibetan presence, and demanded an apology from Beijing.

The 17 Chinese monks and officials invited to this week’s World Fellowship of Buddhists (WFB) conference in South Korea abruptly flew home Wednesday after lodging a complaint about the presence of a Tibetan delegation.

The Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism called their departure “extremely regrettable” and accused them of “lacking the least respect and consideration” for what was supposed to be a purely religious event.

“The Chinese delegates only prioritised their own political agenda by refusing to accept the presence of a Tibetan delegation officially registered as a member of the WFB,” it said in an unusually strongly worded statement.

“The WFB conference should be a purely religious exchange that rules out political interests… we demand that the Chinese delegation offer a sincere apology and promise it will never happen again,” it said.

The Jogye Order also said it actively sympathised with the free religious activities of Tibetan Buddhists and would “seriously reconsider” ties with Chinese Buddhists.

About 400 delegates from some 30 countries are taking part in the two-yearly gathering in the southern city of Yeosu.

The event drew attention after Seoul’s government, in a rare move, approved a visa for Samdhong Rinpoche, an ex-prime minister of Tibet’s government-in-exile.

South Korea has refused in the past to grant a visa for Tibet’s exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, apparently for fear of offending China.

Beijing considers the Dalai Lama a “splittist”, despite his calls for autonomy rather than independence for Tibet, and has stepped up pressure on world leaders not to meet him.
tibet.net

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European Parliament Passes Resolution on Tibet

European Parliament Chamber, Strasbourg, 12 March 2009. An MEP votes amid Tibetan flags/File Photo

P7_TA-PROV(2012)0257

Situation in Tibet

PE491.931

European Parliament resolution of 14 June 2012 on the human rights situation in Tibet (2012/2685(RSP))

The European Parliament,

–    having regard to its previous resolutions on China and Tibet, in particular its resolutions of 27 October 2011[1] and 25 November 2010[2],

–    having regard to its previous resolution of 7 April 2011 on the ban on the elections for the Tibetan government in exile in Nepal[3],

–    having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948,

–    having regard to Article 36 of the Constitution of the People’s Republic of China, which guarantees all citizens the right to freedom of religious belief,

–    having regard to Rule 110(2) and (4) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas respect for human rights, freedom of identity, culture, religion and association are founding principles of the EU and of its foreign policy;

B.  whereas the EU raised the question of Tibetan minority rights during the 31st round of the EU-China Human Rights Dialogue held in Brussels on 29 May 2012; whereas the EU-China Human Rights Dialogue has not resulted in any significant improvements in the human rights situation of the Tibetans;

C.  whereas the envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama have approached the Government of the People’s Republic of China to find a peaceful and mutually beneficial solution to the issue of Tibet; whereas the talks between the two sides have delivered no concrete results and are currently frozen;

D.  whereas the authorities of the People’s Republic of China used disproportionate force while dealing with the protests of 2008 in Tibet and have, ever since, imposed restrictive security measures that curtail freedom of expression, freedom of association and freedom of belief;

E.   whereas the number of victims of the 2008 protests may have exceeded 200, the number of those detained varies from 4 434 to more than 6 500, and there were 831 known political prisoners in Tibet at the end of 2010, of whom 360 were judicially convicted and 12 were serving life sentences;

F.   whereas torture, including beating, use of electroshock weapons, long-term solitary confinement, starvation and other similar measures are reportedly used to extract confessions in the prisons of Tibet by the authorities of the People’s Republic of China;

G.  whereas 38 Tibetans, mostly monks and nuns, have reportedly set themselves on fire since 2009 in protest against restrictive Chinese policies in Tibet and in support of the return of the Dalai Lama and the right to religious freedom in the Aba/Ngaba county prefecture in Sichuan Province and other parts of the Tibetan plateau;

H.  whereas the current state of wellbeing and the whereabouts of a number of victims of self‑immolation remain unknown or unclear, namely Chimey Palden, Tenpa Darjey, Jamyang Palden, Lobsang Gyatso, Sona Rabyang, Dawa Tsering, Kelsang Wangchuck, Lobsang Kelsang, Lobsang Kunchok and Tapey;

I.    whereas Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, the 11th Panchen Lama, was detained by the authorities of the People’s Republic of China and has not been seen since 14 May 1995;

J.    whereas Tibetan identity, language, culture and religion – the testimony to a historically rich civilisation – are endangered by the resettlement of Han people in the historical territory of Tibet and the extermination of the traditional nomadic lifestyle of the Tibetans;

K.  whereas the EU is in the process of appointing and laying down the mandate of the EU Special Representative for Human Rights;

L.   whereas the European Parliament’s previous calls on the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of the EU to address the situation in Tibet with her Chinese counterparts have not delivered the expected results;

1.   Reiterates that the Strategic Partnership between the EU and the People’s Republic of China should be based on shared principles and values;

2.   Calls on the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of the EU to increase and intensify efforts to address the human rights situation of the Tibetans in the framework of the EU-China Human Rights Dialogue;

3.   Regrets, in this respect, the unwillingness of the Chinese authorities to hold the dialogue twice a year and their stance concerning the modalities and frequency of the meetings, with regard in particular to the strengthening of the civil society segment and the involvement of civil society in the dialogue; urges the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union to make every effort to ensure that the human rights dialogue is more effective and result-oriented;

4.   Commends the very important and successful democratisation process in the governance of Tibetans in exile by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the recent transfer by him of his political powers and responsibilities to the democratically elected Kalon Tripa of the Central Tibetan Administration, which represents the aspirations of the Tibetan people;

5.   Commends the decision of the democratically elected new Tibetan political leadership to continue to abide by the Middle-Way Policy of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, which seeks genuine autonomy for Tibetans within the People’s Republic of China and within the framework of the Chinese Constitution;

6.   Endorses the principles set out in the Memorandum on Genuine Autonomy for the Tibetan people, proposed by the envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama to their Chinese counterparts in 2008, which provide the basis for a realistic and sustainable political solution to the issue of Tibet;

7.   Rejects the argument made by the Government of the People’s Republic of China that the engagement of governments with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and members of the elected Tibetan leadership and the expression of support by governments for a peaceful resolution of the issue of Tibet through dialogue and negotiations constitute breaches of the ‘One China Policy’;

8.   Calls on the authorities of the People’s Republic of China to grant meaningful autonomy to the historical territory of Tibet;

9.   Expresses disappointment that the Government of the People’s Republic of China has been unwilling to continue the dialogue with the envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama since January 2010 and encourages the Chinese authorities to engage in a meaningful discussion with the representatives of the Central Tibetan Administration on the future of Tibet;

10. Insists that the authorities of the People’s Republic of China respect the freedom of expression, freedom of association and freedom of belief of the Tibetans;

11. Urges the authorities of the People’s Republic of China to allow an independent international investigation to be conducted into the 2008 protests and their aftermath, and calls for the release of the political prisoners;

12. Condemns any form of torture of persons in custody and invites and asks the authorities of the People’s Republic of China to allow the independent international inspection of the prisons and detention centres in Tibet;

13. Reiterates its condemnation of the Chinese authorities’ continued crackdown on Tibetan monasteries, and calls on the Chinese Government to guarantee freedom of religion both for the people of Tibet and for all of its citizens;

14. Insists that the Chinese authorities reveal the fate and whereabouts of all the victims of self‑immolations in Tibet;

15. Reiterates its call to the Chinese authorities to reveal the fate and whereabouts of Chedun Choekyi Nyima, the 11th Panchen Lama;

16. Calls on the Chinese authorities to uphold the linguistic, cultural, religious and other fundamental freedoms of Tibetans and to refrain from settlement policies in favour of the Han people and to the disadvantage of the Tibetans in historical territories of Tibet, as well as from forcing Tibetan nomads to abandon their traditional lifestyle;

17. Calls on the Chinese authorities to lift all restrictions and allow unfettered access and freedom of movement throughout Tibet to independent media, journalists and human rights monitors;

18. Calls on the EU Special Representative for Human Rights, once appointed, to report regularly on the human rights situation in the People’s Republic of China, in particular with regard to Tibet;

19. Urges the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of the EU to appoint a special coordinator with a mandate to report regularly on Tibet in order to advance respect for the human rights of the Tibetan people, including their right to preserve and develop their distinctive identity and its religious, cultural and linguistic manifestations, to support constructive dialogue and negotiations between the Government of the People’s Republic of China and the envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and to provide assistance to Tibetan refugees, in particular in Nepal and India;

20. Calls on the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of the EU to address the human rights situation in Tibet at every meeting with the representatives of the People’s Republic of China;

21. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice‑President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of the EU, the governments and parliaments of the Member States, the Government and Parliament of the People’s Republic of China, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the Tibetan Government-in-exile, the Tibetan Parliament-in-exile and His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

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A Tibetan Nomad Dies After Burning Self

A Tibetan nomad has died after setting himself afire this morning in Chentsa (Chinese: Jiancha) County, Malho (Chinese: Huangnan) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai Province.

 

According to our sources, Tamding Thar, a Tibetan in his 50's, self-immolated today at around 6:30 am (Tibet Time) in front of the county's People's Armed Police camp. A large number of security personnel appeared at the at the site of immolation within few minutes, sources said. The security personnel extinguished the flames and took Tamding Thar, who was severely burnt.

 

Xinhua, the official news agency of China has also confirmed the report of the self-immolation death today in Jiancha County, Qinghai Province. However, Xinhua has not revealed the identity of the Tibetan self-immolater.

 

After the immolation protest, hundreds of local Tibetans gathered in front of the army camp demanded to be handed over Tamding Thar's body. Chinese authorities told the Tibetans gathered there that they will return the body at around 11 am (Tibet Time). At around 12 noon (Tibet Time), the authorities released the body to the local Tibetans, confirmed our sources. The body was then carried to a remote nomadic area in Chentsa County.

 

At this time of reporting, sources said that there are around 400-500 local Tibetans, in groups, gathered in Chentsa County. Many security officers have also been deployed in the county vigilant of the Tibetan crowds.

 

Tamding Thar belonged to a nomadic family in Lowa village, Chentsathang Township, Chentsa County in Malho TAP. Few years ago Tamding Thar and his family moved to the county due to the 'nomad relocation' policy of the Chinese government, according to source.

tchrd

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His Holiness the Dalai Lama Arrives in Britain

His Holiness the Dalai Lama arriving at his hotel in Manchester, England, on 14 June 2012/Photo/OHHDL

MANCHESTER: His Holiness the Dalai Lama arrived in Manchester, England, at the start of a 15-day visit to England, Scotland and Italy, on 14 June 2012.

There will be live webcasts of His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s talks and teachings from Manchester, UK, on 16-18 June.

16 June: Youth Event
His Holiness the Dalai Lama will address the youth event “Stand Up and Be the Change: Make this the Century of Dialogue” at the Manchester Arena. His Holiness’s address will be followed by a question and answer session. Live webcast can be viewed at http://www.dalailama2012uk.org/webcast.html

17-18 June: Buddhist Teachings
His Holiness the Dalai Lama will teach on Langri Thangpa’s “Eight Verses of Training the Mind” and Nagarjuna’s “In Praise of Dharmadhatu” at the Manchester Arena. Live webcasts can be viewed at http://www.dalailama2012uk.org/webcast.html
Times: (June 17) 9:30-11:30am BST
(June 18) 9:00-11:00am & 12:30-2:00pm BST

17 June: Public Talk
His Holiness the Dalai Lama will give a talk entitled “Real Change Happens” in the Heart at the Manchester Arena, followed by a question and answer session. Live webcast can be viewed at http://www.dalailama2012uk.org/webcast.html
Time: 1:30-3:30pm BST
For times in your region 1:30pm BST on June 16th in Manchester, UK, is the same as 6:00pm Indian Standard Time on June 16th in New Delhi, India, and 8:30am EDT on June 16th in New York, NY, USA.

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Korea Organisers Praise Tibetan Gesture to China Protest

DHARAMSHALA: Organisers and participants of the World Fellowship of Buddhists conference in Korea have highly praised Mr Pema Chhinjor for showing forbearance in response to protests by the Chinese delegation to prevent him from attending the event as a representative of the Central Tibetan Administration.

“The conference organisers and participants have highly praised Kalon Pema Chhinjor for his gesture of forbearance in the face of troubles caused by Chinese protests during the course of the conference. As a gesture of their appreciation, the organisers decided to waive airfare and participation fee for him,”

Over 1,000 delegates from 49 countries took part in the 26th WFB conference in Yeosu in Korea. 17 Chinese delegates to the conference complaint to the organisers not to allow Kalon Pema Chhinjor from attending the opening ceremony on 12 June.

When organisers requested Kalon Pema Chhinjor not to attend the conference for a while, he said: “I have attended the conference at the invitation of the World Fellowship of Buddhists in Korea. Moreover, Korea, being a sovereign country, has no need to buckle under the Chinese government’s pressure. For the convenience of the 1,000 delegates and the conference organisers, I agree to withdraw my participation.”

When he joined the conference after the lunch, the Chinese delegates walked out of the conference in protest.

The Chinese delegates continued to protest on the second day of the conference. They showed in vain some documents to prevent Mr Pema Chhinjor from attending the conference as Kalon of the Central Tibetan Administration’s department of religion and culture, as no one listened to their arguments. A Swedish delegate expressed his disapproval of the Chinese action.

“The Chinese delegates’ tactics backfired as they became the ones who had to leave the conference,” the Department of Religion and Culture said in its press release.

Meanwhile, South Korea’s leading Buddhist organisation, Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, have called the Chinese action “extremely regrettable” and accused them of “lacking the least respect and consideration” for what was supposed to be a purely religious event.

“The Chinese delegates only prioritised their own political agenda by refusing to accept the presence of a Tibetan delegation officially registered as a member of the WFB,” it said in a statement.

“The WFB conference should be a purely religious exchange that rules out political interests… we demand that the Chinese delegation offer a sincere apology and promise it will never happen again,” it said.

tibet.net

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Chinese government make total fools of themselves in UK

Today it appears the Chinese government have made themselves look like total idiots by threatening to withdraw an olympic training team from Leeds in the UK because of a visit by the Dalai Lama. the Chinese attempted to put pressure on Leeds Council to cancel his visit.

The Dala Lama said such interferance from the Chinese was "Routine", "they are always doing this" he said.

Mike Firth, convention founder, said: "He is one of the most travelled men in the world, he has spoken with the most prominent of world leaders, and is one of the most high-profile guests we have ever had."
Previous speakers have included astronaut Neil Armstrong, former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former US President Bill Clinton.

 

 

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Dalai Lama's tour of the UK starts today

His Holiness the Dalai Lama/Photo by Ashwini Bhatia/AP

An event for young people will be hosted by comedian Russell Brand – an unusual double act
When the Dalai Lama addresses young people in Manchester this weekend during a special event, he will be assisted by an unusual master of ceremonies.
Russell Brand contacted the Office of Tibet in London asking to be involved in the event at the MEN arena on Saturday. The Dalai Lama will be preaching the Buddhist message of compassion at a series of talks over three days.
But Saturday afternoon’s session is specifically aimed at young people. Those who are 25 and under can watch and listen for free.
The Dalai Lama will give an address and this will be followed by a question and answer session. The afternoon will also include video messages on non-violence from other Nobel Peace Prize Laureates.
During the landmark event, it will “affirm the Dalai Lama’s message that, in order to build a peaceful world, there is an urgent need to foster a culture of non-violence and dialogue.”
The Dalai Lama is aware of who Russell Brand is because of his public struggles with addictions, and also that he has drawn on eastern teaching and meditation to help him. Brand – who used to be addicted to heroin and is a recovering alcoholic – has been sober for a decade.
The spiritual leader decided to accept Brand’s offer of help during his first mission to Britain since stepping down from his role as political leader of the Tibetan people in 2011. He is seeking to attempt to bring the Buddhist message of “non-violence, dialogue and compassion” to young people.
Anyone who is 25 and under will be admitted free. The tour has been inspired by last summer’s riots.
The Dalai Lama, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, will present youth compassion awards to a young person aged between 10 – 24 in Manchester, then at London and Edinburgh during his tour of the UK.
It is the first time he has visited Manchester since July 1996 when he addressed thousands in a final public event at the Free Trade Hall.
His spokesperson said he wants to call on the UK’s youth to help bring about a new century of dialogue and peace. The cost of the event is £25 for everyone who is 26 and above.
 

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